Spring Festival 2015: An Overview (Part 2)

Starbucks has become an integral part of of our lives here in Guiyang.  We sometimes go to other cafes, because they are closer to home or because they have cats to keep us company, but nothing really compares to the atmosphere at Starbucks.  The Baristas now all know us by name and we’re always welcomed warmly when we visit.  It’s nice being somewhere that not only has indoor heating, but where the customer service is good and the coffee is always fresh.  Signs like these are an added bonus:

This sign is posted in the bathroom.  Many Chinese people don't like western toilets because they are 'dirty', so they hop up ONTO the toilet and squat over that instead.  The result is a very dirty toilet seat.
This sign is posted in the bathroom. Many Chinese people don’t like western toilets because they are ‘dirty’, so they hop up ONTO the toilet and squat over that instead. The result is a very dirty toilet seat.

But Starbucks isn’t just a place to relax.  I do most of my blogging and journaling here as of late, and Dave has been working hard to complete is TEFL certification, so that he can do some teaching if he so desires.  Teaching is an excellent way to meet people, after all, and the extra income means we can take more trips, so there are really no downsides 🙂

It's like they understand coffee here!  Also...it's nice to get away from the smokey haze that seems to be everywhere in Guiyang
It’s like they understand coffee here! Also…it’s nice to get away from the smokey haze that seems to be everywhere in Guiyang

Onto Bangkok, Ayutthya and Chiang Mai!!

The Best of Bangkok First, I must state how much I LOVED Bangkok!  There was something about that city that I can’t exactly explain.  It’s modernity, liveliness and history all combine to provide the experience of a lifetime.  It’s actually very difficult for me to summarize the best things quickly, but I will do my best to try.

Bangkok is located in the center of the country.  It's further north than Phuket but it's actually quite a bit hotter there.
Bangkok is located in the center of the country. It’s further north than Phuket but it’s actually quite a bit hotter there.

As is often the case, the food was a highlight for us.  Our first dinner in Bangkok was an incredible array of seafood that was about half the price of the cheapest food we’d eaten in Phuket (where we never actually had a seafood dinner because the prices were so high!).  The best meal we had though was at a western style bakery near our hostel.  I was actually able to order a smoked salmon sandwich (with capers, REAL mayonnaise and everything!!!) on a toasted EVERYTHING bagel!!  They also had cream of broccoli soup, which I hadn’t even dared to hope for in Asia.  Once more, this may not be exciting for all of you back home…but good bread is enough to get me excited…never mind a proper smoked salmon bagel!!!  And as though the food wasn’t enough, I also found A&W root beer at 7-11!  I sipped it and savored every drop!!

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This dish was made of crab and finely ground egg. It is honestly one of the best dishes I’ve ever had, and I’ve had some incredible food in my time!!

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I don't know if I have EVER enjoyed a sandwich this much!!!
I don’t know if I have EVER enjoyed a sandwich this much!!!

But there is so much more to Bangkok than good food!  There is a great deal of culture there, and in the markets you can find everything from clothing and souvenirs, to flower offerings and seafood.

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Some cooked fish for sale
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Hearts, Stomachs, Livers and Kidneys for sale
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We saw this cool little cat walking along the canopy above the night market as we were crossing the pedestrian street bridge. He’s so stealthy 🙂
Flower offerings like this are everywhere in Bangkok.  They are bought and put on Buddhist shrines as well as shrines dedicated to the royal family
Flower offerings like this are everywhere in Bangkok. They are bought and put on Buddhist shrines as well as shrines dedicated to the royal family
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I actually felt very overwhelmed when we first got to the night market. I hadn’t felt that way since our first days in China. It’s an odd feeling when everything around you (the smells, sights, sounds…) are all foreign.

The most adventurous thing we did in Bangkok happened our last night there, on Kao San Road (it’s the backpacker’s party road).  Although culturally irrelevant, Bangkok has become known for it’s ‘deep fried bugs’.  Just as Cuba is known for their wooden carvings (although they are not popular within the culture itself…just among tourists), people flock to Kao San Road to try deep fried scorpion, tarantula, cockroach and grasshopper.  The Thais we met thought it was quite funny that tourists will pay to try to these things, but we figured we may as well give the fried critters a try!

We tried the silk worms (the small ones near the top of the plate) and the bamboo worms (the fat ones).  Both were alright...not anything I`d go out of my way to order, but they definitely weren`t as appalling as some may assume!
We tried the silk worms (the small ones near the top of the plate) and the bamboo worms (the fat ones). Both were alright…not anything I`d go out of my way to order, but they definitely weren’t as appalling as some may assume!
They also had centipede, tarantula and cockroaches, but I didn`t care to try any of them haha!
They also had centipede, tarantula and cockroaches, but I didn`t care to try any of them haha!

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The Worst of Bangkok

I actually had to ask Dave what the worst of Bangkok was, because I couldn’t really think of anything myself.  In Phuket our options for getting around were to use the shuttle bus (which stopped running at 8pm every day), hop in a tuk tuk, or hop in a taxi.  The taxis and tuk tuks there all refused to use meters, and instead just charged a flat rate that they’d all agreed on at some point, so you couldn’t get a better deal from using one over the other.  But in Bangkok, taxi drivers are far more honest.  They will sometimes try to use a flat rate, but if you request that they use the meter, they do.  As a result, the tuk tuk drivers can’t get away with being as greedy, so the prices are generally a lot better.

tuktuk
The tuk tuks in Bangkok only have 3 wheels and run on propane. They’re a cool little vehicle to be driven around in!

The only exception is at the Grand Palace.  There, the tuk tuk drivers run several scams that involve getting tourists to go with them to jewelry stores and clothing shops, where they are given a cut of your purchase by the shop owners.  They’re quite sneaky with this scheme as well…they tell tourists that the grand palace is closed until *x*pm, but that they (the generous tuk tuk driver) will drive you around the city for a nominal fee until the palace is open again.  It’s gotten so bad that there are actually announcements played outside the palace, warning tourists of the scams.  We had one guy try it with us, but I’d read about it ahead of time so we just walked right by him, but one of the teachers I work with, who also visited Bangkok, did not get off so lucky.  He was taken to several stores before he caught on and nearly had to get into a fight with the driver before he finally agreed to drive them back to the palace.

These signs are posted at hostels and around the palace as well.  It's quite the problem!!
Scams in Thailand These signs are posted at hostels and around the palace as well. It’s quite the problem!!

The Grand Palace was also a bit of a downer.  Although it’s incredibly beautiful and unbelievable ornate, the crowds are ridiculous, and in the heat of Bangkok in February, it was a little too much for me to handle.  Add on the fact that you have to be wearing a long skirt or pants and that your arms can’t be showing, and I was ready to pass out from the heat.  We didn’t spend much time there, but I did get quite a few amazing pictures that I’ll be sharing in a future post 🙂

The crowds at The Grand Palace were a little crazy!  It was like being back in China!!
The crowds at The Grand Palace were a little crazy! It was like being back in China!!

The Best of Ayutthya

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The train ride to Ayutthya is a trip worth taking in of itself. Seeing Thai countryside is an interesting glimpse into ‘real’ Thailand

Although we only spent 1 short day in Ayutthya, it gets a spot in my ‘overview’ post due to its sheer awesomeness.  I encourage anyone who visits Bangkok to take the 1 hour train ride (that only costs 40bhat round trip!!!) to the old city to see the sights. We loved our day there and I wish we’d been able to spend the night.   The best part of the city was definitely its ruins.  It was once Thailand’s capital city, before the Burmese burnt it to the ground, and has since become a UNESCO World Heritage Sight.  We got so many beautiful pictures there!!  Plus, we rented a motorbike, so we had a lot of freedom, going where we wanted when we wanted, which was a nice change after all the tours we’d done in Phuket.

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A sneak peak into some of the beautiful ruins we saw in Ayutthya
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Blue skies make the most beautiful backdrop
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A vacation isn’t a vacation if Dave and I don’t rent a scooter at some point!

The Worst of Ayutthya

I never thought I’d consider seeing elephants and tigers as being the worst thing about a city, but in this case it was.  The elephants weren’t terribly abused (from what we saw), but the Mahoots did have long hooks out, ready to hit the elephants in the head with them if they misbehaved.  The little shops there also sold toy Mahoot hooks for children, which, to me at least, is horrifying.  Teaching children from a young age that it’s appropriate to hit an animal in the face with a sharp hook is not something I think should be done.  But it is…

That metal hook above the elephant's head is called a 'Mahout Hook'.  They use to to stab the elephant in the face if it misbahaves.  Many elephants have had their eyes gouged out by these hooks.  They are commonplace in trekking camps.
That metal hook above the elephant’s head is called a ‘Mahout Hook’. They use to to stab the elephant in the face if it misbehaves. Many elephants have had their eyes gouged out by these hooks. They are commonplace in trekking camps.

Worse yet, we saw several jewelry shops that were selling curious white rings and necklaces.  I went over at one point and tried to look interested.  A woman approached me and said ‘Elephant bone.  Very beautiful’.  I asked ‘oh, they aren’t ivory?’.  She replied ‘no, but THESE are ivory!!!’.  Dave pulled me away before I could tear her apart too badly, but she did get an earful, and at the very least, she knew that I was NOT impressed.  I have a feeling that they weren’t legit ivory, because if they were, they wouldn’t be sold out in the open that way, but just the advertisement that they ARE ivory, perpetuates the trade, and that is not something I can stomach or tolerate.

Magazine-Cover_Blood-Ivory
I’ve always been against the ivory trade, but if you want a real eye opener, this is the edition of National Geographic that made me become more vocal about it. Too many elephants die every year so that rich people can wear pretty jewelry and religious fanatics can carve religious symbols into something that costs an animal it’s life…just for the sake of decoration.

The Best of Chiang Mai

Chiang Mai is located in the north of Thailand.
Chiang Mai is located in the north of Thailand.

Anyone who knows me at all, knows where this is going!  We probably wouldn’t have visited Thailand’s second largest city if it hadn’t been for Elephant Nature Park.  When we decided to go to Thailand for Spring Festival, Dave knew that it would kill me if we went and I didn’t get to spend some time with elephants, so we started doing some research.  We are both very against cruelty against animals, and consider the use of animals for human entertainment to be a form of cruelty (I’ll be discussing why I feel this way in an upcoming post), so we were very picky on where we would be spending our money in Thailand (the best thing an individual can do to stop injustice is to vote with their dollar.  It’s also why I don’t support companies like Apple and Nike, who have been proven to use child labor in their factories).  After a great deal of reading, we found Elephant Nature Park.  Instead of riding the elephants and watching them paint pictures (which may seem harmless, but the training they are given to do such things is unspeakably cruel), you get to watch them BE ELEPHANTS.  We signed up to stay the night and had the experience of a lifetime.  Please believe me when I say I have pictures and stories to share that will be worth reading!!

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Two young elephants cuddling in the river
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Some of the first elephants we met. I don’t know any of their names, but the middle one was not fond of pumpkin, and every time I tried to give it to her, she’d spit it out and look for more watermelon! haha!!
Me and one of my favorite elephants (the one to my right).  The elephant to my left helps take care of Jokia...she's blind.
Me and one of my favorite elephants (the one to my right), Jokia. The elephant to my left helps take care of Jokia, as she was blinded by a mahout years ago.

But the elephants weren’t the only perk to staying at Elephant Nature Park.  We were surrounded by animals our whole stay there!  We even had a ‘pet’ dog who stayed at our cabin.  When we came back in the evening to grab some bug repellent, he ran down the road to greet us…thoroughly happy to see us back!  ENP truly cares about animals.  They’ve rescued over 40 elephants, 400 dogs, 100 cats and even 70 water buffalo!  It was so nice to see animals that were well cared for and who are being given good homes and learning that not all humans are cruel.

This is the sweet boy who hangs out outside the cabin where we stayed.
This is the sweet boy who hangs out outside the cabin where we stayed.
A cat stuck up in a tree.  I got the picture at the exact right moment lol!
A cat stuck up in a tree. I got the picture at the exact right moment lol!
They have signs like this up all around ENP
They have signs like this up all around ENP

The Worst Of Chiang Mai

Like Bangkok, I had do some thinking to think of a bad part of our time in Chiang Mai.  We both enjoyed ourselves so much during our stay at ENP, as well as during our time IN Chiang Mai, that it’s hard to think of a negative thing to say.  We did have one rather irritating experience though…

Banana Plantation
Banana Plantation
Scooting down some back roads near Chiang Mai
Scooting down some back roads near Chiang Mai

 

The old city walls still stands around the ancient part of the city, where we were staying at a hostel called Gong Kew Home
The old city walls still stands around the ancient part of the city, where we were staying at a hostel called Gong Kew Home

We rented a scooter so that we could visit a waterfall near Chiang Mai.  About 20 minutes into a trip, we were pulled over by a police officer who asked to see our licenses.  We were both wearing helmets and in China, you don’ t need a license to drive these scooters (nor do you in Thailand…we saw many many foreigners riding them and I can’t imagine any of them having international drivers licences).  We told him that we had Canadian drivers licenses, but that they were at the hotel (we make a point of never traveling with all our ID in the same place.  We had our passports with us, so we left our drivers licenses at home, thinking they wouldn’t be needed).

The falls where we'd been heading.  They are nicknamed the 'Sticky Falls' because there is a type of algae on them that is so sticky that you can actually climb the falls.
The falls where we’d been heading. They are nicknamed the ‘Sticky Falls’ because there is a type of algae on them that is so sticky that you can actually climb the falls.

It turns out the cop only wanted a bribe.  He told us we’d have to leave my passport with him, go to the police station and pay a 1000bhat fee for a license.  I was not about to leave my passport with anyone I didn’t know (I learned my lesson in China.  All of a sudden they don’t know which passport you’re talking about, but if you give them some money, it might help them remember…), so instead we offered to pay him.  We knew that’s what he was getting at anyway.

For any new travelers reading this:  You will never realize how important your passport is, until someone else has it and won't give it back.
For any new travelers reading this: You will never realize how important your passport is, until someone else has it and won’t give it back.

We didn’t have a whole lot of cash left, as it was the last day of our holiday, and he made fun of us for being ‘broke foreigners’.  It took everything in me not to tell him off for taking advantage of his position as cop.  I wanted to tell him that he should be ashamed for robbing people and leaving us with such a bad impression of a country we’d otherwise really loved.  But instead, I shut my mouth and we went on our way.  I’ve learned through  my travels that lipping off to authority is almost never in your best interest…

This seems very appropriate to describe how I was feeling in that moment
This seems very appropriate to describe how I was feeling in that moment

So that concludes my overview of our stay in Thailand.  There will be much more detailed posts to come, with stories about our Snorkeling Tours (the bad…), our time in Ayutthya (the good) and our day in the James Bond Hongs and at Elephant Nature Park (THE AWESOME!!)

My apologies for the delay in this post.  I’ve actually had it done for days, but haven’t had the internet to post it (or to add the last couple of pictures).  I had originally planned on posting a lot more this week…but fate seems to be working against me.  Or at least the Chinese internet companies seem to be working against me…

Until next time!

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