Ayutthaya: The Ancient Capital of Thailand

Well, my second semester at Interlingua is now in full swing and I have to admit it is off to a much better start than the first semester!  It’s always difficult taking over another teacher’s classes, but when that teacher is loved by students, management and colleagues alike, it’s a little hard to match up.  Somehow I persevered and have proven my abilities.

This is Amanda.  She's very bright and loves learning English (she especially loves hangman!!).  At the end of last semester she got really worried that I wasn't going to come back after my trip to Thailand.  I promised her I'd be coming back and she grabbed me in a huge hug thanking me.  I love my students!!
This is Amanda. She’s very bright and loves learning English (she especially loves hangman!!). At the end of last semester she got really worried that I wasn’t going to come back after my trip to Thailand. I promised her I’d be coming back and she grabbed me in a huge hug thanking me. I love my students!!

Since our return from Thailand, I’ve had several parents come to the school specifically asking for me to teach their children.  Mostly these parents are referrals from parents whose children I already teach.  I’ve also had great feedback from management at the school, who appreciate my organizational skills and diligent lesson planning.  I’ve been asked to extend my contract here and even the other teachers have begun to ask for my help when they are having difficulty with particularly shy students.  I feel like super-teacher again!!  I can’t even explain how great that feels!!!

These are 3 of my students:  Coco, Kyle and Lily (left to right).  I introduced them to Dave while he was at the school one day, and when I came back from recess, I found this lovely mural on my chalk board!  They'd spent their break making it for me :)
These are 3 of my students: Coco, Kyle and Lily (left to right). I introduced them to Dave while he was at the school one day, and when I came back from recess, I found this lovely mural on my chalk board! They’d spent their break making it for me 🙂
One of my higher level students, Zoe, made me this bracelet :)  When she gave it to me she said "I made it for you by myself (we'd learned that phrase last semester)"  and added excitedly "I hope you like it!!".  Clearly, I do :)
One of my higher level students, Zoe, made me this bracelet 🙂 When she gave it to me she said “I made it for you by myself (we’d learned that phrase last semester)” and added excitedly “I hope you like it!!”. Clearly, I do 🙂

But none of that can top how valued my students make me feel.  My kindergarten students in particular are sweet, affectionate and love coming to my classes.  This week I’ve been teaching them family member vocabulary (Mommy, Daddy, Sister, Brother, Grandma, Grandpa…) and then also teaching them phrases that they can use this vocabulary with (Mommy is happy, I have 2 sisters).  On Sunday I taught them a new phrase:  “I love my ______”.  I play a game with them where they have to throw my fuzzy dice at the black board and whichever drawing they hit, they have to make a sentence with it.  So if they throw the die and it hits my drawing of ‘mommy’ they have to say ‘I love my mommy’.  Of course, I always draw myself on the blackboard as well, so they have a reference as to how these bubble drawings are related to me, and before I knew it, they made it a game of throwing the die at MY picture, so that they could say ‘I love my Marie!!!!’.  It was so sweet I could have scooped them all up and hugged ’em forever!!!

This was one of the family pictures I drew.  As you can see, I'm quite the artist!!  (also...my mom isn't always sad...I was just getting them to talk about emotions!!  "Mommy is sad" and then "Your mommy is sad".  My brilliant little monkeys :)
This was one of the family pictures I drew. As you can see, I’m quite the artist!! (also…my mom isn’t always sad…I was just getting them to talk about emotions!! “Mommy is sad” and then “Your mommy is sad”. My brilliant little monkeys caught on so quickly 🙂

But I suppose I’ve gushed enough now.  (If you hadn’t caught on yet…I love my job)

BACK TO THAILAND!!!

Ayutthaya is located roughly 2 hours away by train.  A lovely ride :)
Ayutthaya is located roughly 2 hours away from Bangkok by train. A lovely day trip 🙂

Ayutthaya was founded in 1350AD by a King trying to escape a small pox epidemic.  It became the capital of Thailand or Siam, as it was known at the time.  Fast forward to 1767, when the Burmese army invaded and burnt the city to the ground.  What’s left today are the stone structures that survived the sack of Ayutthaya…

IMG_4442
The city Burma left in ruins is now a UNESCO World Heritage Sight

We took the train down to the old city, which was apparently the cheapest way to get there but provided the best views.  It cost us a total of 40 Bhat to get there and only 30 Bhat to return ($1.54 and $1.16 respectively), so we definitely didn’t break the bank on the trip.  Also, it’s a fairly popular destination, so it was no problem to get help at the train station, even though many of the staff didn’t speak much English.

IMG_4352
Waiting for the train
IMG_4354
A Thai train ticket. I love their writing 🙂

I had done a bit of reading ahead of time, so when we arrived in the ancient city, we knew our best option for getting around was by scooter.  I would have never been brave enough to drive myself (in Thailand, they drive on the opposite side of the road), but Dave is brave that way, and before long we were cruising around the city, in search of some lunch.

IMG_4355
Clearly, I was pretty excited 🙂
IMG_4357
Our scooter for the day. It was smaller than our scooter in Guiyang, but it runs on gas (ours is electric) so it had WAY more power!
IMG_4363
I got this shot while we were moving. I love it because it shows so much…a tangle of power lines…a line up of public phones (do those even exist in Canada anymore??) and a 7-11….Thailand is a neat place!

We found a tiny little restaurant (we weren’t even sure if it was a restaurant at first!) before too long, and the woman who greeted us quickly set off to cook us something we hadn’t yet ordered.  This was probably for the best, as we know basically none of the Thai language and wouldn’t have known what to ask for anyway.  What she brought us was delicious 🙂

IMG_4371
Pickled peppers and spices on the table
IMG_4374
Dave, chillaxing at our table
IMG_4379
Lunch 🙂 Seafood fried rice 🙂 You can’t go wrong with that!!

Next we set off to find us some ruins…

We found 3 different sites, and each was unique in its own way.  Three happens to be the perfect number of items to have on a list such as this, so I shall continue this post in list form.  Also, I can’t remember the actual name for each site, so I’ve dubbed them by their defining features instead.

Sight #1:  Wat Maheyong

I saw the very first elephant I’ve seen in my life as we drove up to this site.  It was being ridden, which wasn’t ideal, but it was still there…He was an enormous male, with long tusks.  He had 2 people in the chair and a mahout riding his neck.  Before long we saw many more elephants, all being ridden around a beautiful scene of burnt stone and open fields.

IMG_4399

IMG_4400
His mahout stopped for a moment so that I could take a picture…I think he was hoping I’d go pay for a ride if he did. The elephant’s eyes looked sad to me…or at the very least, he looked distant…not present at all, like the elephants we saw at ENP.
IMG_4406
A neat scene

We didn’t know it at the time, but these were actually the most plain ruins that we saw the whole day…we were still impressed!!

IMG_4405

IMG_4393

Before long, we decided to see what else Ayutthaya had to offer, so we began to head back to the scooter.  That’s when the rain started…

IMG_4415

You know what they say though…February shows, allow Marie to make new friends???  We ran inside where there was shelter.  Nobody likes scooting in the rain!!!   That’s where I met this lovely lady.

IMG_4421
This is the first elephant I ever really ‘connected’ with. She seemed much happier than the one we’d met on the trail…probably because she didn’t have hundreds of pounds of weight on her back. One of the staff told us that she is 90 years old, and that that’s why she wasn’t being ridden anymore. From what I learned about elephants at Elephant Nature Park though, I can tell that she’s quite young. She’s also quite small, as elephants go, so I think that THAT’S why she wasn’t being ridden…not because she’s too old.

I didn’t want to ride the elephants, but I had no problem feeding her so that’s where we spent our Bhat instead.  Elephants are SUCH cool eaters!!!  Their trunks are absolutely amazing!!!

When we ran out of bananas, we bid the sweet girl farewell and wandered over through the market for a while.  There wasn’t much to see, but we did run into some tigers that were quite obviously drugged for picture taking purposes. I won’t go into too much detail here (I’m planning a whole post on how to be an Eco-conscious tourist in the near future), but neither of us  were disappointed when we couldn’t get pictures of the sleepy animal.  Instead, we went and visited some more elephants, who weren’t drugged.  They were mostly just curious of us (and hoping we had bananas for them!!)

IMG_4425
Perfectly timed photo! He thought my scooter helmet was a basket of fruit, I think!
This funny boy kept throwing grass on top of his head.  Elephants do this with dirt (it's a natural sun screen for them), so maybe that's why he was doing it?  Elephants also tend to get a little nutty at trekking camps, which could have had something to do with it.  One of the mahouts came over and took the grass off his head and the elephant immediately (and kinda definatly) threw more back on top of his head.  He was a funny guy...
This funny boy kept throwing grass on top of his head. Elephants do this with dirt (it’s a natural sun screen for them), so maybe that’s why he was doing it? Elephants also tend to get a little nutty at trekking camps, which could have had something to do with it. One of the mahouts came over and took the grass off his head and the elephant immediately (and kinda defiantly) threw more back on top of his head. He was a funny guy…

After a run in with some sales people claiming to sell ivory jewellery (see my post: Thailand an Overview Part 1 for more details on that little adventure…), the rain cleared and we left in search of some more ruins.  What we found…was more elephants!! (and some INCREDIBLE ruins!!)

Sight #2 – Wat Phra Kam

It wasn’t long after we left Wat Maheyong that we started spotting more elephants.  We figured there were probably ruins nearby, so we turned in and found a place to park the scooter.

IMG_4437
We watched this poor elephant sit down for a photo op. I thought she was going to fall over during the transition from standing to sitting.
IMG_4439
We walked through a lovely park on our way to the ruins

IMG_4457

There was an entrance fee to this set of ruins, but it was well worth the 50bhat ($1.91) we paid to get in.  I’ll let the photos do the explaining…

IMG_4467
The entrance into the ruins. I had no idea it would get so much better from here!
IMG_4482
There are burn marks on a lot of the stone but so much of the structures are still intact. I went so camera happy that I managed to kill our battery before making it out of this park! We had to charge the camera at a little shop so that we could take pictures of the 3rd set of ruins!
IMG_4509
One of my favorite pictures of this sight. It was such a beautiful day, and the green trees and the red stones were just beautiful together!
IMG_4477
The blue sky made an excellent backdrop!
I am the coolest :)
I am the coolest 🙂

 

IMG_4490
Looking at ruins through the ruins 🙂
IMG_4507
If this is all that’s left of this place, I would have LOVED to see it in all its glory.
This is the main building amongst many smaller ones.  It was huge!
This is the main building among many smaller ones. It was huge!
IMG_4543
A couple offered to take a picture for us up near the top of the structure. We had to climb many stairs but it was worth the photo!!

 

The remains of a religious artifact
The remains of a religious artifact

When the Burmese invaded Ayutthaya, they didn’t just burn the city to the ground.  The plan was to annihilate the population; nothing was safe.  Their buildings were burnt and their culture was destroyed.  Not even their sacred places were spared.  When I was in Inner Mongolia, years ago, I witnessed the same sort of defilement.   When the Japanese army had invaded China during WW2, they destroyed many temples.  One particular temple stood out to me…the temple itself is still in Baotou, but every single Buddha that had been carved into the stone (there were hundreds!) had had its nose chipped off.  Desecration of religious space is common in times of war.

Sight #3: Wat Barom Buddha Ram

There are so many sights to see in Ayutthaya.  Although I’d read online that it was a cool place to visit, I hadn’t realized just HOW cool, so we’d only scheduled a half day to see it all.  As a result, we missed out on many of the neat things there were to see.  With our tight schedule, we had to pick and choose where we would stop, so after visiting Wat Phra Ram, we quickly zipped over to the most famous sight in Ayutthaya:  Wat Barom Buddha Ram.  You’ll see why it’s famous in the pictures below.

IMG_4557
The setting sun also made for gorgeous pictures!  Dave kept trying to move me along, but this Buddha was too gorgeous to leave!!

IMG_4558

 

IMG_4576
Dave is the 2nd coolest :p
IMG_4578
There were dozens of headless and broken Buddhas here.
IMG_4586
His lips are still gold!
IMG_4617
My camera isn’t tilted on this one…the building is!
IMG_4591
Some of the plaster is still visible on this one. We think they might be restoring it

 

IMG_4561
This is why Wat Barom Buddha Ram is so famous. This fallen Buddha head had a tree grow around it 🙂

So that was Ayutthaya!  If you’re ever out near Bangkok, I HIGHLY recommend taking the day trip!  Especially if you’re a history nut, like me!  It’s a neat city and we didn’t even see half of what there was to see!  I guess that just means we’ll have to go back…

I’ll be away until next week (I won’t be popular this weekend…it’s test time!!!), but when I return, I’ll be blogging about The Grand Palace in Bangkok, Thailand!

Hope to see you back soon!

 

 

 

 

 

 

One thought on “Ayutthaya: The Ancient Capital of Thailand”

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s