Beautiful Suzhou – Snaps from the City

In a week from today, we will begin our trip back to Canada for the summer!  First, we’ll be stopping by Las Vegas to see some friends get married (more on that next week!) and we also have plans to drive around the area a bit to see The Grand Canyon in all its glory. We were originally planning to take a 10 day road trip back to Manitoba, but those plans fell through when we learned that the car rental alone would cost us $1500.  So, instead, we’re going to take a camping trip at our favourite park (Rushing River in Ontario) while we’re back.

 

I am excited to cook over the fire, and wake up to the sound of loons, but mostly I look forward to the smell of fresh air and being surrounded by trees.  I miss the smell of trees a lot.  I actually played a gig a few weeks back at a large park just outside of Shanghai.  It was the most grass I’d seen in about a year.  Since then, I’ve been dying to get back into the Canadian wilderness.

 

That’s not to say I don’t love Suzhou though!  Lately, it’s been quite rainy, but for about a month before the rain hit, we had gorgeous clear skies and (mostly) clean air.  I took advantage of that time to snap some shots of the city we currently call home.  I thought people might like to see Suzhou the way I see it.

 

Suzhou has plenty of beautiful parks and gardens.  I know I’ve posted some of these pictures of them before, but they’re just so pretty, I have to show you again!

 

Suzhou also has some interesting architecture outside of their gardens.  For some reason I don’t understand, China is obsessed with creating replicas of famous buildings from around the world.  Beijing has a replica of Sydney Opera House, and Shanghai has its very own copy of the Eiffel Tower, and Suzhou apparently, didn’t want to feel left out.  So they made a replica of London Bridge (sort of).

 

There are definitely some inaccuracies, but over all, it looks pretty cool.  The bridge is mostly used for wedding pictures, and the surrounding area has plenty of places for photo-ops.

 

Although Suzhou is pretty during the day, I find this water-town most beautiful at night.   Dave and I have spent many evenings walking around, taking pictures of the high-rises that are popping up all around SIP (we live in Suzhou Industrial Park).   I love the way the buildings here are all lit up.

 

The canals are also gorgeous at night.  The reflections from the buildings give them a dream-like feel.

 

Of course, Xinghai Square is such a buzz of lights and traffic, it makes for some very interesting night photos as well.

 

The city recently replaced the lights along the street outside of our apartment complex, which was a nice change.  The old ones, though pretty, were getting pretty rusty, but the new ones are nice and bright white.

 

Central park is also very pretty at night.  We often walk through there on our way to (or from) one of our favourite restaurants:  Lu Yu.  They specialize in a type of roast fish that’s unlike any fish you’ve ever eaten in your life.

riverside_grilled_fish_566x424_fillbg_88cea81f46
Kao Yu:  It tastes better than it looks!

Kao Yu has actually become a bit of a weekly tradition we have with some friends.  We walk down there (it’s about a half hour walk each way), and meet up to discuss our weeks and enjoy some good food and draft beer.  The walk there takes us through Suzhou’s Central Park, and I’ve brought my camera along a few times now.

But as much as we like Kao Yu, there is one restaurant in Suzhou we love even more.  A few months back, we told our bilingual friend, Kevin, that if he could find us a restaurant that makes Guizhou food (the province where we lived prior to moving to Suzhou), that we would take him there for dinner.  We’ve gone there pretty much every week since he found it.  We’ve brought countless friends and even people visiting from America and Argentina…every person we’ve brought has been floored by how good the food is!

In addition to the food and the company being so great at 去贵州, the view is also pretty spectacular.  We usually sit outside, across from the little island near Suzhou University.

Of course, I’m not the only one that’s caught on that Suzhou is an incredibly photographic city.  My friend, Kevin, also enjoys taking photos of this gorgeous place we all call home.  I asked him if I could include some of his shots, and he kindly said I could. Here they are:

That’s all for this post!  I’ll be back soon with an update on life here.  We’ve been so incredibly busy lately!  There are plenty of stories to come!

See you soon!

So, You’re Moving to China…(Part 2)

As promised, I am back with part 2 of my post!

5.  Kiss Comfort Goodbye

Whether you’re in your apartment or at a restaurant, the standards of comfort in China are very different from out west.  Beds are often rock hard, couches are frequently nothing more than a wooden bench, and restaurants (in certain areas of the country) forgo purchasing conventional tables and chairs, and have everyone sitting at child-sized tables, with plastic stools.

IMAG0641
Our couch in Guiyang.  My butt would go numb within about 10 minutes.
IMAG1188
One of our favourite hot pot places….not exactly the most comfortable restaurant…

And it’s not only your butt that will miss the comfort.  People here have a different idea of what ‘public space’ means.  I frequently see people watching movies on their tablets in public spaces (in the metro…at Starbucks…in restaurants…), without using ear buds.  When you have several people doing this in the same space, the room becomes so cluttered with noise that it’s difficult to think.

IMG_20160326_153520
After taking this picture, and posting it online, I saw someone post an article about how it’s wrong to take photos of strangers.  I agree…except for in cases when those individuals have forsaken their rights to privacy by taking away my right to focusing on my blog…

Smoking is also common place here, and you will see it everywhere you go.  Restaurants, shopping malls and even some schools all allow smoking and although Beijing and several other cities are beginning to make smoking illegal in public spaces, China still has a long way to go before you can enjoy a meal without choking on someone else’s cigarettes.

IMG_20151002_233739
Without reinforcement, signs like this don’t actually do very much.  There are ‘no smoking ‘ signs in most elevators, after all…it doesn’t stop people from lighting up in them…

And even in private spaces, China finds it’s way in.  People in our apartment building frequently leave their front doors open to air out their personal spaces….this often results in my own apartment smelling like cigarettes.  Our neighbours across the hall have apparently run out of room in their apartment, so they’ve begun storing personal items outside of their door, in the hallway…They are currently keeping their baby stroller and several other objects (including open umbrellas…) right outside of our door.

And Fireworks….The Chinese use them to ward of evil spirits and the following events all merit their use:

  • Weddings
  • Funerals
  • Birthdays
  • New Businesses Opening
  • Festivals
  • Holidays
  • Just because they like to make noise…
IMAG1561
Fireworks are a constant here.  When you live on one of the higher floors of a building, you’ll wake up to the sound of these things going off right outside your windows.  One day, when we were living in Guiyang, our apartment got smoked out when a new business had opened up downstairs.  We’d had our windows open…

Even babies don’t get any break from the discomfort of living in China.  I can’t help but wonder what this sort of thing means for this poor kid’s neck muscles…

IMAG0705

6. Traffic Laws are Non-Existent…and Mayhem most Definitely Ensues…

It’s rare that you will see a police officer pulling people over for bad driving.  It’s so rare, in fact, that the only time I can remember it happening was in Guiyang, when police officers caught on that they could get bribe money from e-bike drivers who aren’t wearing helmets.

IMG_2886
Take Note: There are no drivers in many of these cars.  In Suzhou, people frequently park in the areas meant for uturns….because… why not?  Sidewalks are another very popular place to park and double parking is common.  There’s no end in sight for this behaviour, because nobody gets ticketed for these types of things.  It’s beyond me…

The results of this lack of enforcement are terrifying.  In Suzhou, the driving isn’t TOO bad.  There are e-bike lanes and for the most part, people pay attention to stop lights and stay in 1 lane at a time…Well, ok, that might be a little generous…

I don’t have many pictures of this stuff, because, I’m usually trying to jump out of the way of drivers who are busy taking selfies instead of watching the road, but this video that I took in Guiyang should give you a pretty good idea of what it’s like driving, or ever walking, in China…

 

7.  You’ll Begin to Appreciate the Most Surprising things…

The most mundane things in Canada become the most appreciated in China.  Something as simple as Shake n’ Bake chicken is the cure to culture shock and bad days.  Although I was never really big on Deviled Eggs back home, I’ve grown to love them in China, because they remind me of Christmas and Thanksgiving.

One of the best things is getting care packages from home.  Getting Coffee Crisps, clothes that fit and western spices is such a great event!  It’s like the best Christmas gift you can imagine!!  I especially love getting letters from my nieces and nephews, though it’s common that China Post loses those.  I’ve had countless letters mailed to me over the past 2 years, but I’ve only every actually received 2.  Most of our family and friends have given up sending things, and I can’t say I blame them.  Canada Post charges an exorbitant fee to send packages overseas, and when they likely won’t even make it to us…what’s the point?

IMAG1618
China Post workers going through their mail deliveries…this could be why so many packages go missing….

On the subject of ‘stuff from home’, I realized something amazing about myself while I was finding pictures to use for these posts.  I apparently have a need to photograph any western-brand sign I see.  It must be the excitement of seeing something from Canada or America IN China…

8.  Signs:  The Good, The Bad and The Incomprehensible

This category doesn’t need much explaining….Let’s start with the good…

The Bad…

And, of course, the ones we can barely understand…

9.  Things are Just Done Differently Here… (Part 2)

Of course, there are a few things I forgot to write in this section of my last post, so here they are…

  • Public space is used differently here…Below is a photo of a man shaving.  In the metro.  On his way to work…

IMG_20151123_075944

  • Advertisements are weird.  These women are serving pie…in a glass cage..to promote a new restaurant.  They’re white…and it was weird…so people stopped.

IMG_7163

  • Products are also weird.  The grossest one I’ve seen are the facial creams that are supposedly made of human placenta.  They have a rejuvenating quality to them….yeah….no thanks….IMG_20160319_224523
  • Crowds….crowds like you have never experienced…

IMG_7142

  • Chinese medicine can be questionable.  I have tried acupuncture here and it did not go well.  I wound up passing out and I think the guy did more damage than good.  I’m a pretty firm believer in scientifically backed treatments, but if you want to try eastern remedies, I do urge you to seek out professionals.  Cupping is one of the most popular thing for westerners to try out.  It’s pretty harmless, and it leaves some pretty wicked (temporary) scars that you can show off.  Every Chinese person I’ve asked swears that it does wonders…
IMG_3064
A friend of mine, after a Cupping session.  The welts go away after about a month…

Some Final Tips for your Time in China

  • Buy clothing and shoes before coming to the country.  Even petite girls can have a difficult time finding clothing here, because generally there is NO ROOM for curves in Chinese clothing.  If you’re busty…shop at home accordingly, because you will not find anything above a B cup here.  Similarly, it’s difficult to find shoes bigger than a lady’s size 6 or 7 (36 or 37 in European sizes).
  • While the Chinese are perfectly ok wearing mini skirts where you can actually see their bums when they bend over, cleavage is a nay nay…Be prepared to have pretty high cropped shirts here, ladies.  It’s inappropriate to show off your goods (on the upper part of your body anyway…)
  • Learn how to use Tao Bao!  It is truly a life saver.  You can use Bing Translate or google translate if you have a VPN.  ***Tip:  Translate whatever it is you want to buy into Chinese (Google Translate works very well).  The prices are much lower if you search in Mandarin.
  • Buy bedding foam.  There’s very little worse than having a bad sleep.  The first time I lived in China, I was able to get used to the hard beds, but now…I find it unbearable.  There are all sorts of foam mattresses you can buy (Tao Bao is your best bet!) to soften up your bed.  They are invaluable and I HIGHLY recommend buying one!
  • Find a local store that carries western goods.  Metro, Carrefour, Walmart, Decathelon and Euromart are some of the best.  Tao Bao also carries a wide range of western brands, so that’s always an option as well.  It’s amazing how comforting it can be to find taco seasoning or salty popcorn when you have had a bad week.
  • Get a VPN (preferably before you enter the country)!  I couldn’t blog or keep in touch with anyone on Facebook if it weren’t for my VPN.  For $100 a year you can get set up with Astrill or Express, and both are reliable and fast.  The government does sometimes crack down on that stuff, so expect the occasional glitch in service, but for the most part, I feel that they do pretty well.

My last piece of advice before ending this post:  surround yourself with positive people.  There’s nothing worse than spending time with people who do nothing but complain about the culture and the country.  Of course, it’s inevitable that you will need to rant now and then, and that’s totally okay.  But I’ve met so many foreigners who spend their time abroad angry that the people here won’t conform to what THEY think it normal.  Those types of Lao Wai kinda suck…so don’t be like them.  Remember that there are good things and bad things in EVERY culture, and you don’t come from a perfect country any more than the Chinese do.  Be tolerant, and when it gets REALLY bad…grab some western bevies  (because Chinese beer is pretty terrible) and chill out with people who are going through the same things you are.

IMG_2753
Having a positive group of friends is key to surviving overseas.  I can’t claim that we’re all positive all the time, but we all count ourselves lucky to be having this incredible experience, and when all else fails, beers at Euromart, or a night out at KTV can go a long, long way for the spirit!!

That’s it for today!  My next post will be an update on life in Suzhou!  I’ll have pictures from my first gigs (I’m singing in a band :)), the Drama Festival at my school and all the stuff that’s been keeping me busy and away from my blog!

 

 

 

An Update on Life in Guiyang

It’s beautiful and sunny  here in Guiyang, and it’s one of the hottest days we’ve had this year.  We chose to spend our day off scooting around the city and enjoying the beautiful scenery that Guiyang has to offer.  Guizhou’s rugged beauty is something that I know I’ll miss as we move on to the next phase of our travels.

Life here has definitely improved.  Part of that is because the worst of culture shock has passed…we’ve become accustomed to some of the things we find difficult in China (the last minuteness of everything…the terrible driving…the lack of customer service) and as a result we are both feeling a little more relaxed than we were back in October and November.

culture shock
See my post about culture shock here

So I suppose it’s true…time heals everything.  But I wouldn’t be giving myself due credit if I said that time alone helped my circumstances.  After all, with all the problems I was having at the beginning of my contract, there were several routes I could have taken.   The way I see it, I had 3 options at the time:

  1. I could have given up and quit/gone home.
  2. I could have given up trying…after all, I didn’t feel that my efforts were appreciated or noticed.
  3. I could power through and continue being the best I could be, in the hope that that would eventually be recognized.

Of course, given my tenacity, I chose the 3rd option.  Instead of sulking or giving up, I turned my focus to the classroom.    I transformed that bland room into an engaging environment where my students can learn.  I also started spending more time on my students themselves…creating customized worksheets to help the ones that were struggling with spelling…learning new songs for the students who love music…looking for new activities and games to ensure everyone is getting the most out of their classes.  And it paid off.  I’m now considered one of the top teachers at the school, and that means a great deal to me.

So I suppose I’ve been keeping busy.  I’ve spent hours on these displays and sometimes I don’t even bother going back to the staff room for breaks, I just tidy up the classroom and add posters to the walls.  And while I’ve been been so busy powering through the last six months, life outside the school continued…

We’ve celebrated milestones:

Undergone transformations:

IMAG1819
Anyone who thinks marriage is lame, by the way, is not married to the right person.

Received countless care packages from home, which always brighten our day (and restock our goodie bin!!

We’ve made friends…both of the human and furry variety:

And, of course, we have tried many new foods 🙂

One of our favorite new restaurants is in the Future Ark area of Guiyang.  Dave made a video to show you all what street food in Guiyang is like:

I have experienced so much in the last 6 months.  There have been highs and lows, but no matter what has happened, I’ve had a constant positive in my life:  my students.  They are really the best part of being here.  I know I should be exhausted every Sunday night, after back to back 10 hour days…but I always find myself energized at the end of it all.  I have no doubt that teaching is my true calling…I have never loved a job as much as I love this one.

IMAG1187
How could I ever complain when I’ve got kids as cute as Poppy, who brought me a rose on Saturday…just because 🙂

Sadly, it really hit me this week that I’m going to be leaving soon and that although I’m excited to move on, I don’t know how I’m going to say goodbye to some of these kids…

But I suppose, once more I need to remind myself not to complain.  I’d rather have met these kids and have to say goodbye, than have never met them at all.  They’ve all taught me so much.  Smile (a little boy in one of my kindergarten classes) has shown me how he can be brave, no matter how scary it was for him to be away from his parents when he first began coming to class.  Lee taught me that no matter how bratty a child may be, they can ALWAYS turn it around.  And Chuck…Chuck taught me that 6 year olds can get brain cancer, and that I should cherish every moment I have with all of my beautiful students.

IMAG0274
He was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer 3 months ago. His classmates still ask where he went. I have no idea how to answer…

Bangkok’s Grand Palace

Guiyang is truly a city of extremes.  Just yesterday, the temperature was 30 degrees Celsius, and I had the windows in my classroom open so I could enjoy the cool breeze and the sun’s rays.   Today, the view that lies before me as I blog at our favorite hang out (I’ll give you 3 guesses…) couldn’t be more different.   People are bundled up, with the arms around themselves trying to stay warm.  There was a 20 degree drop over night and Guiyang is once more overcast and dreary.  I’m grateful for the little bit of sun we did get, but I am a tad mournful that our two nicest days were the days that I spend inside, teaching back to back classes.

Here are some pictures from our lovely weekend:

IMAG1623
People are planing vegetables
IMAG1620
Our garden in Zhong Tian is green and beautiful once more
IMAG1622
Even the buildings weren’t as drab this weekend. Everything was brighter when the sun was out.

And Guiyang now…

But whether isn’t the only way Guiyang likes to shock us with its extremes.  For example:

"Is this a dump", you might ask yourself.
“Is this a dump”, you might ask yourself.

Nope…not even close…

It's the entrance to the school where I work
It’s the entrance to the school where I work

To be fair, the area isn’t usually THIS bad, but one of the businesses in the building is renovating and decided to dump all their garbage outside the back doors.  I’m terrified a rat is going to jump out the garbage heap and attack me.

IMAG1651And if garbage heaps aren’t enough for you, there are also these open gutters to scare the bajeepers out of you.   The local noodle place and many other little businesses (as well as pedestrians) throw their garbage in here and it’s developing quite the collection.  This could be solved by putting a metal grate over the gutter, but that would probably be too much work, so instead I have to hop over this to get to the school daily.  I’m not going to lie…the first time I saw it I gagged a little lol.  Scooters sometimes drive over it and splash people as they walk by….when that happens, you have to walk around smelling like garbage water all day.  Not fun…

But not all of Guiyang is open sewers and garbage piles…if you drive for 10 minutes to HuaGuoYuan, then you get this view:

IMAG1655
Fountains and lit up buildings

Or 5 minutes away from the school, this area is also quite new and shiny:

IMAG0443

IMAG0439

20150402_184016
And then of course, there’s the nicest building in Guiyang…
Whiiiccchhhh caught fire the other night...
Whiiiccchhhh caught fire the other night…

So yes, Guiyang is the city of contrast.  But I suppose I should get on to writing about a place that has no contrast at all.  The Grand Palace in Bangkok Thailand has one mode:  Go Grand, or Go Home!!!

IMG_4679
In addition to gorgeous architecture, the Palace is home to many gardens and carefully trimmed trees.

The Grand Palace has been home to Thailand’s Royalty since 1782.  Today, the grounds are more of a tourist attraction than anything, but Royal ceremonies and State functions are still held there several times a year.

IMG_4640
Despite the high fees to get into the palace, tourists flock here. Trip adviser probably has something to do with it, as the palace is considered Bangkok’s #1 attraction.

I was surprised to learn that The Grand Palace is not a singular giant structure, but really a large number of small buildings that vary in a great deal of ways.  In the 200 years that the Palace has sat in Bangkok, pavilions, chapels and halls were erected, all reflecting the time period in which they were built.  The resulting diversity within the grounds is fascinating.

For example...
For example…

Also worth noting is the sheer size of the Grand Palace.  At 2,351,000 sq feet, it would take several hours to view the whole Palace, a feat neither Dave or myself were ready to take on.  We arrived on February 19th, under a scorching Bangkok sun.  Between the heat, the tourists and our long pants and shirts (there is a strict dress code at The Grand Palace), we weren’t up for seeing the grounds in their entirety.  So we hit up the major attractions and took lots of breaks in any shaded areas we could find.

IMG_4669
The perimeter walls were covered in elaborate murals. Seeing as how this was one of the few places where we could find shade, I spent a great deal of time admiring them.
IMG_4668
Most of the murals showed Buddhist mythology and war stories during different king’s reigns.

But if I were to tell you that the diversity of the buildings or the size of the place were the most remarkable things about The Grand Palace, I would be doing it a great disservice.  No amount of photography could possible capture the elaborate detail here.  Every inch of every building was designed to be beautiful and ornate.  It was so Grand that if you didn’t stop and actually look at it, you might not even notice the level of detail at all.  It is all THAT detailed!!!

IMG_4648
You can easily see that this building is gorgeous without even having to look at it closely.
But up close, you can see that all the colour on the columns going up the building are actually designs made one small piece of stone at a time.
But if you move closer, you can see that the colorful parts going up the building are actually elaborately designed flowers…

 

Similarly, this building is covered in small stones..it isn't just paint that makes it look so ornate...
Similarly, this building is covered in small stones..it isn’t just paint that makes it look so ornate…
IMG_4655
This steeple is beautiful in of itself.
But if you zoom in closer you see an insane level of detail on each of the mythological creatures
But if you zoom in closer you see an insane level of detail on each of the mythological creatures
IMG_4677
Here is a close up on one of the tours of one of the smaller buildings on the grounds

We walked around for about an hour, taking pictures of different halls and structures.  We went into a few buildings as well, although we weren’t allowed having our cameras out in them.  I understand the reasoning, to an extent.  Having cameras flashing while Buddhists try and pray in front of the sacred Emerald Buddha would be incredibly disrespectful.  Still, as a non-Buddhist I was a little sad I couldn’t get a shot or two in while in Wat Phra Kaew (The Temple of the Emerald Buddha).  I did manage to get one decent shot from outside the building though, and I found a picture online of the different robes he wears, depending on the season.

He isn't very big, but he is very beautiful.
He isn’t very big, but he is very beautiful.
Emerald Buddha
There are 3 distinct seasons in Thailand, so there are 3 robes for the Buddha to wear

We also saw some of the Throwns that former Kings used while living in the Grand Palace, which was sort of neat.  We also weren’t able to take pictures in those buildings, but one of them had a massive fan where I was able to cool down!  It was a highlight of the day for me!! haha!!

IMG_4688
More of the beautiful buildings we saw
IMG_4687
The cloud cover didn’t help very much with cooling us down.
IMG_4650
To understand the size of these buildings, look at the people in the front of the building for reference.
IMG_4647
A photographer’s heaven 🙂
IMG_4642
I love the style of this building

 

IMG_4636
The guards at the front gate
IMG_4633
A close up of one of the guards

There are actual guards at the Palace too.  Just like you’d see at Buckingham Palace, tourists were making faces and taking pictures with the guards, as they solemnly stood guard to some of the more important buildings on the grounds.

IMG_4681
We couldn’t go into this building. I think this is one of the places where Government meetings are still held now.

So that is The Grand Palace.  I’m not disappointed that we went, but I can hardly say that it was the highlight of our Bangkok experience.  I suppose Dave and I tend to not like the really ‘touristy’ stuff, so that could be why I didn’t enjoy it more.  But on the other hand, the history lover in me LOVED seeing the different buildings.  It’s definitely worth a stop while you’re in Bangkok!!

My next post is going to be about night life in Thailand!  I’ll be writing about the famous Bangla Road in Phuket, Kao San Road in Bangkok and of course, the famed Thai Lady-Boys!!

Thanks for stopping by!!

 

Home Sweet Home Away From Home – Part 2

I’ve just returned from a gorgeous stroll around Zhong Tian Hua Yuan.  My heart rate is still elevated, and my cheeks are still a little flush, and I feel like a million bucks!  Over the past month, Dave and I have been upping the ante in maintaining a healthier lifestyle.  This has, of course, been partially in anticipation for the inevitable bathing suits that we will wear in Thailand, but it’s also more than that.  For the past 3 years of my life, I’ve been terribly unhealthy.  I’ve picked up some nasty habits (both nutritionally and physically) that have resulted in gained weight, a weakened immune system and overall sentiments of discontent.   My health fell low in my list of priorities while I juggled my university degree, a demanding job, home renovations and a variety of other factors.  It was unfortunate, certainly, but as any university student can tell you…some times all you have time to eat (or can afford to eat!) is a burger!

I fell victim to McDonald's Dollar menu more times than I'd like to admit. Seeing as how I was relying on their coffee a great deal to get through the long days at school, it was just so easy to pick up a burger with my Lg double double.
I fell victim to McDonald’s Dollar menu more times than I’d like to admit. Seeing as how I was relying on their coffee a great deal to get through the long days at school, it was just so easy to pick up a burger with my Lg double double.

But since I finished my exams in April, I’ve bumped health back up to the top of my priority list, and I couldn’t be happier about that decision.  In the last 8 months, I’ve lost 30 pounds and I’ve lost 4 inches around both my chest and my hips.  But more than that, I have more confidence than I’ve had in ages.  Not only because I’m looking better, but also because 30 pounds is a HUGE accomplishment.  I feel like I can do anything!!  It’s such a great feeling!

So far, I've lost as much weight as this cat weighs!!
So far, I’ve lost as much weight as this cat weighs!!  30 pounds is also the weight of 240 eggs, a human head, or a flat tire!!

And in addition to all the fantastic endorphins my body releases while I take these long walks, I’m seeing more of Zhong Tian, and Guiyang is feeling more like home, as I explore the gardens here and begin recognizing the owners of the shops I pass by each night.

IMAG0508
The view from our bedroom window. I’m looking forward to springtime when I can journal from inside that pagoda 🙂
The night market where we go for bbq. I often go by this alley when I go for walks at night
The night market where we go for bbq. I often go by this alley when I go for walks at night
This was the view from the bedroom of our old apartment. The dome is Zhong Tian's pool and the courtyard in front of the dome is where the neighbors excercise in the morning, dance at night and practice gong fu daily
This was the view from the bedroom of our old apartment. The dome is Zhong Tian’s pool and the courtyard in front of the dome is where the neighbors excercise in the morning, dance at night and practice gong fu daily

If you’d like to see more of Zhong Tian Hua Yuan, please check out the video we made this week!  We gave a mini tour of our garden and a bit of the community park.  We’ll be posting many more like it and I’ll be sure to update you as I blog!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19M6S577mMA

But living in Zhong Tian isn’t always a walk in the park.  As I mentioned in my last post, our apartment does leave some things to be desired.  The cockroaches and grease drenched walls definitely made me want to cry, but still…there are more things that have made me laugh (and shake my head) in Zhong Tian than have reduced me to tears.

See previous post for more information on how we broke these pipes by cleaning them!
See previous post for more information on how we broke these pipes by cleaning them!

Take, for example, our walls when we first move in.  For us, it was a no-brainer to paint them, but clearly the apartment’s previous tenants hadn’t thought that way.  Instead of patching holes in the walls, they stuffed Kleenex into the holes and then covered them in tape (that they covered with white out so that the colour sort of matched the rest of the wall).  Another popular technique to hide stains and holes in the walls at our apartment was to cover them up with posters and calendars.  We had several big bulky calendars in our living room (some of them for the wrong year) and many old, faded posters.  When we took them down, it was easy to see why they’d been placed there, but we still didn’t want to put the smelly paper back onto the walls (the previous owners smoked so everything smelled).  The worst thing about this form of ‘covering up’ issues though, wasn’t the posters themselves.  It’s that all of these ‘quick fixes’ had been stuck onto the walls with scotch tape, which couldn’t actually be removed from the walls.

Our bedroom door. We took the red poster off, but the tape remains...
Our bedroom door. We took the red poster off, but the tape remains… Our whole living room and dining room looked like this prior to our painting…

We discovered soon that a wide variety of things here are remedied with tape (and I’m not talking about duct tape…it’s usually packing tape, scotch tape or two sided tape…).  For example…we had water coming into our kitchen from an upstairs neighbor. The repair guy showed up to fix it, and decided that cutting a hole in our ceiling was the best way to figure out what was going on.

For example...we had water coming into our kitchen from an upstairs neighbor. The repair guy showed up to fix it, and decided that cutting a hole in our ceiling was the best way to figure out what was going on. He did replace the missing chunk of ceiling though! Any guesses how??
He did replace the missing chunk of ceiling though! Any guesses how??
Yup...he taped it right back up there...
Yup…he taped it right back up there…

Unfortunately, not everything in our apartment is so easily fixed….before we moved in, the school had our fridge and our toilet replaced because they were in such bad shape.  Those were two major things for Huang to replace for us, so we’ve let other things go unrepaired because there’s no point in trying to fix everything when we’re only living here for a year.  Some examples…

IMG_3125
The light above our dining room table is frustratingly non-functional. At first, we thought that it just needed a new light bulb, which was the case in nearly every other light socket in the apartment, but a new bulb didn’t do anything. Luckily, as we replaced the bulbs in the adjacent living room, the dining room also got brighter.
IMG_3123
The A/C is still a bit of a sore spot for us. Most apartments in Guiyang don’t have them, so when we found out this one did, we were thrilled and willing to overlook the cleaning we’d have to do as a trade off. We confirmed with the land lord that it worked (he said it did) but we never thought to check it ourselves.  We did ask the landlord to fix it, but property owners in Zhong Tian don’t seem to like to invest money into fixing anything in their buildings…

My favorite ‘unfixable’ problem in our apartment though, is in the kitchen.  We only discovered this particular issue after living in the apartment for 2 months.  It took us so long to discover the problem because that particular light socket is an odd shape and it took ages to find a light bulb that would fit it.  Even when we did find this odd light bulb (Naveed informed us that they are actually quite popular in England…), we could only find one that was far too long for the light fixture, so we had to leave it off.

The lightbulb only comes in size 'ridiculous'
The light bulb only comes in size ‘ridiculous’

The easiest way for me to explain what’s wrong with the lights in our kitchen is to show you, so we’ve made another video 🙂  I’m going to learn how to embed videos right into my blog soon, but as some of you know from my FB page, this week has been a little frustrating for me as I learn how to set up my blog in a more visually appealing way.  So for now, just follow this link to see the silly way our lights act in the kitchen:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-8MEMvYcpM

But it the entertainment (and headaches) our apartment provides for us doesn’t end with quick fixes and the unfixable.  China hasn’t yet implemented much in the way of ‘safety standards’, and as a result, we have a phone line that runs through our shower, electrical sockets hanging out of the walls and flooring that has absolutely no texture, so if you are wearing socks, or are coming out of the shower, the likelihood of slipping is astronomical.  Slippers or shoes are nearly always worn indoors.

I'm pretty clumsy as it is, so the fact that Dave hasn't put these up around the apartment everywhere to remind me to be careful is a little surprising!
I’m pretty clumsy as it is, so the fact that Dave hasn’t put these up around the apartment everywhere to remind me to be careful is a little surprising!

We have definitely refrained from complaining about all these small things to the school, because we know that this is just what life is like in China.  Landlords don’t HAVE to fix things…your lights don’t ALL have to work…leaky ceilings are only a big deal if they’re causing damage in your apartment…things are just a little different here.  But in spite of our attempts to complain as little as possible, the school’s accountant grew very tired of us in the weeks after we moved into the new place (she is in charge of fixing problems in the teachers’ apartments).  The final straw was when I told her the washing machine didn’t work.  Now, in all fairness, that’s sort of a big one…..without a washing machine, I can’t come to work in clean clothes.  I’ve yet to see a laundrymat in Guiyang so it wasn’t something we could just live without.  But, as it turns out, our washing machine wasn’t actually broken; we simply had no idea how it worked.

In our defense, everything is in Chinese, so we didn't know that the middle dial needed to be turned all the way to the left for the machine to work...
In our defense, everything is in Chinese, so we didn’t know that the middle dial needed to be turned all the way to the left for the machine to work…

We soon discovered that it would have been better if our washing machine actually WAS broken, because now that it works, we have to take the following 14 steps to doing our laundry every week.  For your enjoyment, we photo-documented the process 🙂

2 - Laundry
Step 1: Face the beast…you will be dealing with her for the next hour or so….
1 - Laundry
Step 2: Begin boiling water, because although our hot water tank is directly above the washing machine, it does not provide hot water FOR the washing machine. We can take water from the shower, but only if neither of us plan on showing for the evening…the tank isn’t big enough to do both laundry, and shower…
Step 3: Remove the lid for the washing side (because it doesn't stay upright on its own). The blue circle at the bottom of the washing machine is what does the work, by the way. It spins both clockwise and counterclockwise to clean your clothes...
Step 3: Remove the lid for the washing side (because it doesn’t stay upright on its own). The blue circle at the bottom of the washing machine is what does the work, by the way. It spins both clockwise and counterclockwise to clean your clothes…
Step 5: Round up your clothes and throw them in the washing machine. Make sure that you don't throw in too much because the blue circle will only spin with a key amount of clothing in the washing machine
Step 4 : Round up your clothes and throw them in the washing machine. Make sure that the amount of clothing is exactly right because if there’s too much, the blue circle doesn’t spin, but if there isn’t enough, the spin section of the washing machine doesn’t work (yup…spin cycle is in a different part of the machine.  We’ll get to that…
Step 5: Add your first 2 kettles full of boiling water (make sure the drain valve is closed first...). Refill your kettles (yeah, we have 2) and get them boiling again.
Step 5: Add your first 2 kettles full of boiling water (make sure the drain valve is closed first…). Refill your kettles (yeah, we have 2) and get them boiling again.
Step: Add some cold water (by hand, with a hose, because the hole kinks up and sprays water all over the kitchen if you don't hold it just right...)
Step 6: Add some cold water (by hand, with a hose, because the hose kinks up and sprays water all over the kitchen if you don’t hold it just right…)
Step 7: Roughly 20 minutes later, you have warm water to wash your clothes in. Turn the far left valve all the way counter clockwise and let the machine do it's thing for 35 minutes
Step 7: Roughly 20 minutes later, you have warm water to wash your clothes in. Turn the far left valve all the way counter clockwise and let the machine do it’s thing for 35 minutes
Step 8: After 35 minutes (25 of which are spent just allowing the clothes to soak between clockwise or counterclockwise spins), your clothes have been 'cleaned'. This is what the water looks like. China is very dusty by the way...
Step 8: After 35 minutes (25 of which are spent just allowing the clothes to soak between clockwise or counterclockwise spins), your clothes have been ‘cleaned’. This is what the water looks like. China is very dusty by the way…
Step 9: Turn the middle valve all the way to the right, to let the dirty water drain out.
Step 9:  Get more hot water boiling and turn the middle valve all the way to the right, to let the dirty water drain out.
Step 10: once the water is drained, turn the middle valve back to the left and fill the machine with cold water. Turn the far left dial about 1/3 around so that you get about 10 minutes of swishing to rinse the clothes. While this is happening, start boiling more water
Step 10: once the water is drained, turn the middle valve back to the left and fill the machine with cold water. Turn the far left dial about 1/3 around so that you get about 10 minutes of swishing to rinse the clothes.
This is what the water looks like after the first rinse. We rinse it a second time (using hot water) because I'm pretty sure the clothes still aren't actually clean at this point.
Step 11:  This is what the water looks like after the first rinse. We rinse it a second time (using hot water) because I’m pretty sure the clothes still aren’t actually clean at this point.
Step 12: Let the water drain out one final time. I should also mention that when the water drains, it goes down a pink plastic tube that leads into a drain in the floor of our kitchen. This pink tube has been knocked out of the drain before....it can be a bit messy when that happens...
Step 12: Let the water drain out one final time. I should also mention that when the water drains, it goes down a pink plastic tube that leads into a drain in the floor of our kitchen. This pink tube has been knocked out of the drain before….it got messy…
Step 13: The clothes are now ready to be moved over to the other side of the washing machine, where they are spin dried.
Step 13: The clothes are now ready to be moved over to the other side of the washing machine, where they are spin dried.
I do have to admit that this feature works quite well, and probably saves us a day or two of drying time. Oh yeah...did I mention that they don't have clothes dryers here? You hang dry it all... Oh...and the plastic piece you put on top of the clothes so they don't fly out while they spin!
I do have to admit that this feature works quite well, and probably saves us a day or two of drying time. Oh yeah…did I mention that they don’t have clothes dryers here? You hang dry it all… Oh…and the plastic piece you put on top of the clothes…it’s there so they don’t fly out while they spin!
Step 14: Hang up your clothes to dry. We are lucky enough to have inherited a couple of dehumidifiers that speed up the process.
Step 14: Hang up your clothes to dry. We are lucky enough to have inherited a couple of dehumidifiers that speed up the process.
The key is to spread out everything as far as you can. In winter, it can take 2-3 days for everything to dry, so you also do laundry with that in mind.
The key is to spread out everything as far as you can. In winter, it can take 2-3 days for everything to dry, so you also do laundry with that in mind.

So that’s what it’s like living in a Chinese apartment.  As I mentioned in my last post, we live in the poorest province in China, so it’s definitely different elsewhere in the country.  The laundry was a pain at first, but once you get into a routine, it gets much easier.  The worst is when Dave throws the clothes in the wash, because he hardly ever checks to make sure I have a pair of pants to wear while the clean ones dry.  I came to China with 5 pairs but I now only have 2 that properly fit me (and they’re already pretty loose), so that’s always a bit of a struggle.  He’s pretty happy though, because I’ve forbidden him to do this part of the laundry routine again….you’ve lucked out this time, Reimer…

We are only 20 days away from Thailand now, and we’re both getting VERY excited about the trip!  Between now and then I hope to be writing some posts regarding what it’s like to be a teacher here.  It’s the end of the semester, so as I do my progress reports and correct tests, I’m beaming with pride as I see how much my students have learned in the last 5 months.  I think it’s a good time to write about the wonderful experience teaching can be!

Stay tuned and be sure to check back soon!

Home Sweet Home Away from Home – Part 1

Well, another weekend is coming to an end and I must say we spent it well.  A good portion of our time was spent in coffee shops, where I was either working on my blog, organizing pictures or finishing up some test corrections.  This may not sound very adventurous, on the surface, but it was all about the location this weekend!  We’d been hearing about a cafe that had several cat occupants for a while  now, so we decided to go hunt it down on Monday.  As an animal nut, I’ve gotta say I was pretty stoked to spend my day off surrounded by purring and fur 🙂

Favorite shot of the day.  This sweet girl became our bestie when I gave her some kitty treats :)
Favorite shot of the day. This sweet girl became our bestie when I gave her some kitty treats 🙂
She has the softest fur and the bluest eyes!!
She has the softest fur and the bluest eyes!!
This little man came over for a visit shortly before we left.
This little man came over for a visit shortly before we left.

Although it is great going on adventures and discovering new things,  it’s also just so fantastic to sit down and relax like we did this weekend.  The whole time I was finishing my degree, we worked like mad so that we could get our butts to China and slow down.  I feel like this is one of the only weekends where we’ve actually done that…slow down….since we got here.  It was well deserved and very appreciated!  And best of all, it was relaxing but still productive!  I had time to go through several hundred photos and figure out exactly what I wanted to show you about our apartments in Guiyang.  It turned out there is A LOT I want to show you, so this is probably going to turn into two posts.  I’ll make sure that they are posted closely together though, so that you don’t have to wait 3 weeks before the comedy portion of my story (SPOILER: this post is the tragedy portion ;))

First off, I need to give a bit of back story for those of you who don’t already know about our first apartment in Guiyang.  We moved in our second day here (after spending our first night at a hotel) to find the place moldy, damp and spider infested.  It was a beautiful apartment, and had so much potential if the land lord had been willing to maintain the place, but unfortunately, that hadn’t been the case.

5 Upstairs bathroom mold
The upstairs bathroom was particularly bad. There was mold everywhere and the entire room smelled of sour yogurt and rotten fish. We spent a great deal of time trying to pinpoint what exactly we were smelling…
6 Upstairs bathroom mold
the same counter after an hour of scrubbing, done by yours truly.

We tried to make the best of it, and did our best to clean the place up.  The apartment did have some wonderful features, including a balcony and a rooftop terrace (SO BEAUTIFUL!!).  It looked like it was all going to work out in that big apartment.  We had to climb 10 flights of stairs to get to our bedroom, but the exercise was doing us some good.  The spiders were terrible but were improving as we cleaned the place up.  We spent hours cleaning up the terrace and bringing the plants up there back to life…  I actually started to like the place…

But then it started raining…

7 Leaky Ceilings
And the rain started coming in…. It didn’t take long for us to realize why half the lights in the place didn’t work…
8 The results of that leaky ceiling
And the ceiling started to crumble…
9 - A growing problem
And then it got worse….

As a result of our ceiling starting to fall apart, our land lord decided to increase his efforts in selling the place.  He’d spent a small fortune trying to fix the apartment’s many problems already, and he wasn’t willing to spend anything more.  So he started showing the apartment 4-5 times a day, several days a week.  He was really friendly with us, so we put up with it for a while…

Then the mold started coming back…

That was my final straw.  I broke down and told the school how awful the place was and asked them to move us to a more suitable apartment.  We were fine with a smaller space and we were perfectly ok giving up the rooftop terrace.  After all…what good is a rooftop terrace, if you’re battling fungal pneumonia??  (2 of the teachers who’d lived in this apartment in the past couple of years had developed lung problems as a result of that mold…)

My boss felt awful about the whole mess, and began searching for a new apartment for us right away.  After several days of searching, she found us something that had 2 bedrooms (a requirement so that Dave could work from home) and that was in the school’s price range.  And that’s how we ended up where we are now!

I have to admit…it wasn’t love at first sight.  The stairwell left a lot to be desired, but I’d already learned in Xiamen that stairwells hardly ever reflect the individual apartments that they lead to.  So as I climbed the 3 flights (only 3 flights!!) to my new apartment, I kept that in mind.

10 Stairway to Our New apartment
The stairs leading up to our apartment
11 The entrance to our new place
Apartment 302. The outside of our door also has lots of red banners on it, presumably for good luck.

Step 1:  Remove Current Inhabitants…

The place was much smaller than the 3 story ‘rooftop-terrace’ space that we’d been occupying for nearly 2 months, but it was mold-free and had a lot of potential.  My first task was originally to wash the walls, because the previous tenants had been smokers, and the walls were all stained yellow…

Yum...right??  They had about 20 posters and banners up all over the apartment and this is what the wall looked like behind each of them...
Yum…right?? They had about 20 posters and banners up all over the apartment and this is what the wall looked like behind each of them…

Of course, my priorities quickly changed upon our first night-time visit to drop off some of our things (when you are moving everything down 10 flights of stairs…you do it bit by bit!).  We opened the door and turned on the lights, only to see about 10 cockroaches scurry under the furniture and into nooks and crannies.  I’d gotten used to cockroaches in Xiamen (they were EVERYWHERE there!), but in Guiyang we’d only seen a handful in 2 months, so this came as a surprise.  When we witnessed the same thing the following evening, we knew that the apartment we’d agreed to move into was far dirtier than we’d originally thought.

At this point, I definitely just wanted to curl up into a ball and cry…but I’m a ‘doer’, so instead of giving up, we found some heavy duty cockroach killer and got rid of the little monsters…

There are many ways to kill a cockroach, but the quickest and most effective way is to smoke ’em out.  You buy this stuff that sort of looks and acts like incense: you light the end, wait til the thing actually catches, and then blow it out.  The smoke does the rest!  It’s very important to get out of the apartment quickly after lighting the sticks, because they can seriously damage your lungs, but they work amazingly well at killing the roaches.  You basically let the stuff work for a few hours, come home, open the windows and sweep up the carcasses…yummy…I know….

Step 2: Declutter!!!!

Now, I realize that there is value in keeping things and fixing them when you can…but the Chinese take that to a new level.  When we moved in, there was so much stuff left over from the previous tenants, that we filled between 5 and 6 big black garbage bags with trash.  Among the things we found are:

  1. A stack of broken plastic stools
  2. Teddy bears and children’s pillows that were stained with cigarette smoke (I should also add that no children actually LIVED in this apartment)
  3. Large buckets with stagnant water sitting in them.
  4. Old ceramic pots that had (at some point) held plants.  They were still filled with dirt…
  5. A total of 4 desks (2 of which are broken)
  6. Mounds of old Chinese magazines and books
  7. Several broken dishes
  8. Drawers full of fish food, newspaper clippings burnt out extension cords
  9. Several broken lamps
  10. soooo much more….
This was how the spare bedroom was originally set up.  There were several desks , and many many broken stools in the room.
This was how the spare bedroom was originally set up. There were several desks , and many many broken stools in the room.
15.2 Decluttering
It’s still a little cluttered now, but it’s all neat and actually clean. The water dispenser you see was left here by the previous tenants. It’s listed as one of the items that are covered by our damage deposit, so we can’t throw it out…
The other side of the room, which Dave uses as an office.  I really like the way we set up this room.  It looks so much better!
The other side of the room, which Dave uses as an office. I really like the way we set up this room. It looks so much better!

We also swept up a garbage bag worth of dust, hair and dirt from behind and under all the furniture and spent hours wiping everything in the house down, because pretty much everything was covered in a layer of dust (and in some rooms, everything was covered in a layer of grease AND a layer of dust).  I don’t know if the people who lived here before us had ever cleaned anything…ever…

Our very cluttered bedroom.  It started off with teddy bears, pillows and a tonne of old books (that were missing pages and covers...).  We also found a gigantic hanger in this room...shoved behind the armoir.  Not sure why they didn't just throw it away....
Our very cluttered bedroom. It started off with teddy bears, pillows and a tonne of old books (that were missing pages and covers…). We also found a gigantic hanger in this room…shoved behind the armoir. Not sure why they didn’t just throw it away….Oh…and btw…that’s Timore 🙂  She is the Chinese Staff Manager.
I never got a before picture of this side of the bedroom, but this is how it looks now.  Pretty standard as far as bedrooms go...except of course that we've bought like 4 different pads for the bed so that it doesn't feel like we're sleeping on a piece of plywood.  Chinese beds suck!!
I never got a before picture of this side of the bedroom, but this is how it looks now. Pretty standard as far as bedrooms go…except of course that we’ve bought like 4 different pads for the bed so that it doesn’t feel like we’re sleeping on a piece of plywood. Chinese beds suck!!
Our very cluttered kitchen.
Our very cluttered kitchen.  To be fair, it looked like this because we’d moved one of the broken desks into here as well as the water cooler…we were a little tight on space until we got the place organized!
Our kitchen now.  Once more, there are certain things we couldn't throw out because of the damage deposit.  We needed counter space anyway, so one of our broken desks became just that :)
Our kitchen now. Once more, there are certain things we couldn’t throw out because of the damage deposit. We needed counter space anyway, so one of our broken desks became just that 🙂 Of course there is more to our kitchen’s new look than simple decluttering…but I’ll get to that in a moment….

Step 3:  Paint!  (Because washing the walls just wasn’t an option!!)

After killing all the cockroaches, and getting the dust and dirt out of the place, our next mission was to wash the walls.  The light switches were all filthy and the walls all had tape stuck to them and stains everywhere.  Of course, when we started to wipe down the walls, we quickly realized that our apartment had never actually been painted.  Instead of paint, a thin layer of plaster covered the concrete walls, and as we wiped away the dirt, we also wiped away the plaster.  This why we had to paint…it was honestly not in our original plans….

The light switch outside our 'sink room' before I cleaned it...
The light switch outside our ‘sink room’ before I cleaned it…
The same light switch after approximately 30 seconds of work...
The same light switch after approximately 30 seconds of work…

On top of the damage we did to the place while trying to WASH it…the previous tenants had stuck posters and banners on the wall with scotch tape, and as we tried to remove all these ugly posters, a lot of plaster came off with them…  It’s probably for the best that we painted the place.  I don’t know if we would have gotten our damage deposit back if we hadn’t…

The living room wall before we painted...
The living room wall before we painted…
The same wall after we painted
The same wall after we painted
The other side of the living room.  I love how much warmer this place got with a bit of paint, and some replaced light bulbs...only 1/5 of the light bulbs in the living room worked when we moved in...
The other side of the living room. I love how much warmer this place got with a bit of paint, and some replaced light bulbs…only 1/5 of the light bulbs in the living room worked when we moved in…

4.) Scrub…Scrub….Scrub…..

So, I’ve already mentioned that there were a lot of cockroaches here when we moved in, and I also mentioned that cockroaches aren’t a huge problem in Guiyang so their presence indicated a problem with the cleanliness of the apartment, right?  Well…step 4 was the most unpleasant of all the steps we took to making this place livable.  Yes…it was worse than the cockroach carcasses and even more gross than finding old, moldy underwear hiding in a closet (that actually happened at the first apartment, but still…).  I’ll let the pictures do the talking…

Dave, wiping the mold and grime off of the bathroom ceiling...
Dave, wiping the mold and grime off of the bathroom ceiling…
Our bathroom before....(we actually had them replace the toilet because there was NO WAY I was sitting on that thing!!)
Our bathroom before….(we actually had them replace the toilet because there was NO WAY I was sitting on that thing!!)
24 Bathroom After
Our bathroom now.  Notice that there is no shower in the room.  That’s normal in China.  Instead, they just have a shower head in the middle of the bathroom.  We added the shower curtain so that our toilet paper would stop getting wet…
The 'sink room' that's right outside the bathroom.  We put up a shower curtain here as well...mostly to hide the ugly, rusty pipes that we simply couldn't get clean....
The ‘sink room’ that’s right outside the bathroom. We put up a shower curtain here as well…mostly to hide the ugly, rusty pipes that we simply couldn’t get clean….

After spending an entire day scrubbing these two rooms so that they were useable, we decided to wait a while before tackling the kitchen.  Eating at restaurants is cheap here anyway, and we weren’t in a hurry to cook yet.  Of course, we did eventually have to open that door and deal with the grease and filth.  Once more, I will let the pictures do the talking….

What our kitchen originally looked like.  Notice the grease stains on the far left wall?  Yeah...that was basically everywhere...
What our kitchen originally looked like. Notice the grease stains on the far left wall? Yeah…that was basically everywhere…
31 A Greasy Kitchen
Some wonderful ‘mid way through’ pictures. Notice the wall in the right part of the picture has been wiped down. I still hadn’t gotten to the left side yet…though it made for a good visual….
32 A Greasy Kitchen
It took us several weeks to get the kitchen completely clean. We had to stop and take a picture as we finished up on the first day. And yes…this is all just grease. What bothered us both the most is how easy it was to clean all this…All it really took was some degreaser and some hot water, and most of it just wiped off.  Apparently the previous tenants weren’t up to that task though, so they’d just let the filth build up instead.  I don’t even understand how they cooked in there…

And some of my favorite pictures….

Our hot water tank, before we cleaned it...
Our hot water tank, before we cleaned it…
And after.  Oh, and yes...our hot water tank is in our kitchen.  We don't actually get any hot water IN our kitchen, but there just wasn't enough room for it in the bathroom, I guess...
And after….
The hood to our range before (at this point I actually thought that the glass was frosted...)
The hood to our range before (at this point I actually thought that the glass was frosted…)
And after...well...kind of in between...I just took a picture at this point because I couldn't believe that the glass had just been that dirty!!!
And after…well…kind of in between…I just took a picture at this point because I couldn’t believe that the glass had just been that dirty!!!
The ceiling above the range...
The ceiling above the range…
Annnd after...
Annnd after…
You can feel free to be grateful for the way damage deposits work in Canada now...
You can feel free to be grateful for the way damage deposits work in Canada now…

Step 5:  Fix what you broke while you were cleaning!!!

In addition to the grease and dust and cockroach poop (yup…lots of it…in the kitchen…..Bleach anyone!?!?!?), we also had a lot of lime build up that needed to be cleaned off the pipes.  Of course, we didn’t realize that the only thing keeping these old pipes from leaking was that very build up.  So after a day of scrubbing, we had to laugh when the pipes started leaking, making a mess in the kitchen.  Luckily the school fixed it quickly, but I never thought that cleaning a kitchen could actually MAKE a mess!!!

The pipes above our kitchen sink.  They carry the water from the hot water tank to the bathroom.
The pipes above our kitchen sink. They carry the water from the hot water tank to the bathroom.
42 Woops!
The pipe closest to the wall began to leak at the joint when we had the audacity to… GASP…clean it!! lol!!!

In total, we spent nearly 3 months making this place home.  It was a lot of work, but it was all worth it in the end because now this place is ours.

As I finish this post, I want to leave you with 3 thoughts:

1.) China is a crazy place.  Their cleanliness standards aren’t the same as they are in the west, but this apartment is not the norm for foreigners living in this incredible country.  I happen to live in a poor part of the country and our boss was trying to get us out of an even worse apartment, that could have made us sick if we’d stayed there much longer.  So PLEASE don’t think that Chinese people are all this filthy, or that schools here don’t care where they put their foreign teachers.  We just had some bad luck…

2.) I’m not writing about this all to gross you out, or to make you never want to come see us…I’m writing it to show you that the things you take for granted in Canada just aren’t ‘a given’ here.  When you move out of an apartment in China, you don’t lose your damage deposit if the place isn’t clean.  That means that you sometimes have a massive mess to clean up when you move into a new place.

and 3.)

I wrote this to show you what you are capable of (and to remind myself what I’M capable of), with a bit of determination.  A lot of people I know would have refused to live in this apartment, but we worked with what we were given.  This whole “China Experience” is about confronting all the difficulties of living in a foreign culture after all…it can’t all be trips to Guilin and walks along ancient walls!!!

So that concludes the ‘drama’ part of my Apartment Post.  Stay tuned for my next post, which will show you all the nutty ‘quick fixes’ that are common place in China!  This apartment sure has character!!!

Rugged Guizhou / Rugged Health

First off, I must apologize for my 2 week WordPress hiatus.  I hoped I’d never go so long between posts, but between trips to northern Guizhou with the school and terrible flues and colds, I haven’t had much time to sit in front of a computer.  But it would appear that I’m back into the swing of things today!  We have all but finished cleaning our (terrifying) kitchen, and our Christmas tree is up and glowing 🙂  We even made time to visit Grandma’s kitchen today, where we enjoyed some fantastic western food.   It’s been a good weekend 🙂

IMAG0994

Dave's Super Burger
Dave’s Super Burger from Grandma’s tonight.  It’s fully loaded with ham, bacon and an entire fried egg…
Meitian is too small to be included on a map like this, but it's right above Zunyi.  Guiyang, where we live, is right in the center of the province
Meitian is too small to be included on a map like this, but it’s right above Zunyi. Guiyang, where we live, is right in the center of the province

So I suppose I’ll start this post on the more positive topic: our trip to Meitan, Guizhou province. Meitan itself is a tiny town that is famous for its red tea production.  After spending a year in Xiamen, where Oolong and Green tea are most popular, I was eager to learn about the red tea of Guizhou province.

We made several stops in the area, viewing gigantic tea pots and statues built to honor the tea making traditions of Guizhou province.  We were especially happy to get out of the school bus that transported us 4 hours north of Guiyang.  Although the bus meant a free trip to the hot springs, it is designed to transport 8 year olds and even the shortest of us (myself included) couldn’t sit with our knees facing forward.  It was a bit of an uncomfortable ride!!

IMG_3035
This is the same school bus that greeted us at the airport in August 🙂
The whole foreign Interlingua crew (minus Naveed, who couldn't come).
The whole foreign Interlingua crew (minus Naveed, who couldn’t be there)
The lady who answers the phones at Interlingua.  She doesn't speak any English but she always laughs at my jokes when I try to make them in Chinese.
The lady who answers the phones at Interlingua. She doesn’t speak any English but she always laughs at my jokes when I try to make them in Chinese.
One of many gigantic tea pots around town.  One of them is actually a hotel!!
One of many gigantic tea pots around town. One of them is actually a hotel!

Our bus driver must have been a tour guide in another life-time, because he knew all the best places to stop.  After having some lunch in downtown Meitan, we headed for the tea fields, which I hadn’t seen since my time in Fujian.

Turned to get a shot of this field and saw Jumoke way out in the distance haha!  His eccentricities are what make him a good teacher.  His students adore him :)
Turned to get a shot of this field and saw Jumoke way out in the distance haha! His eccentricities are what make him a good teacher. His students adore him 🙂
Of course, he did need to find his way back afterward, and he didn't want to damage the tea leaves, so he sort of flipped over each line until he made it back
Of course, he did need to find his way back afterward, and he didn’t want to damage the tea leaves, so he sort of flipped over each line until he made it back

This was a natural point for us to stop and try some of Guizhou’s finest tea.  Manny, the recruitment guy for all 3 Interlingua Branches, knows how much I love tea, so he made sure to let me know we’d be doing it all traditional style.  I was pretty excited, not only because I love tea, but also because a lot of the Mandarin I know is useful in a tea shop.  I spent a lot of time in them in Xiamen, and being in them now always makes me feel so fluent!  I don’t think anyone there noticed that I knew what she was saying (other than the poor saps who were stuck sitting beside me, listening to me yammer excitedly…Sorry Dave and Lexie!).

IMG_3052
Our lovely tea demonstrator 🙂
Lexie and I....notice the look of giddiness on my face....that's what I refer to as my 'caffeine face' lol!
Lexie and I….notice the look of giddiness on my face….that’s what I refer to as my ‘caffeine face’ lol!
The boys, waiting patiently for their tea :) (From front to back we have Jumoke, Andrew, Daid and Mauricio.  I even got Ouyang in the shot, although he isn't paying a whole lot of attention!
The boys, waiting patiently for their tea 🙂 (From front to back we have Jumoke, Andrew, Daid and Mauricio. I even got Ouyang in the shot, although he isn’t paying a whole lot of attention!

After making some purchases at the tea shop, we head out to our hotel, which was located quite remotely, but was clean and quite nice.  It even had indoor heating, which didn’t work in everyone’s rooms, but still!  It worked in some!!!

Meitan International Spring Hotel
Meitan International Spring Hotel

After the all you can eat buffet (where Ouyang had us try some fermented tofu…which tasted like you might think rotten tofu should taste…), we got into our bathing suits and headed down to the lobby for the main reason for this trip:  Hot Springs!!!  Unfortunately I couldn’t get many pictures because the steam didn’t allow for much, but I did get a few of the entertainment.  Not only were there girls waving their arms (aka:dancers) to watch, but there was even a male performer who came up and serenaded unwilling females.  And of course, he came over and welcomed the lao wai to the hotel!

Lexie, Lumi and I enjoying the heat :)
Lexie, Lumi and I enjoying the heat 🙂
Tried to get a pic of the boys but Dave's hotness was steaming up the picture :P
Tried to get a pic of the boys but Dave’s hotness was steaming up the picture 😛
One of several performers that entertained us while we soaked
One of several performers that entertained us while we soaked
The most entertaining of them all
The most entertaining of them all

Things were going well for the Interlingua clan at this point.  We were all relaxed and enjoying the steamy baths.  It felt good to unwind in the ‘wine pool’ (that smelled like sulfur and alcohol) and the ‘rose pool’ (which sounded like sulfur and flowers).  But then David’s stomach started to go south…(not my David…Brittish David).  By the following morning, 3 of the crew had been throwing up (including MY David) and several more of us felt under the weather.  It was a long 6 hour bus ride back to Guiyang, including the hour we stopped for lunch (when Huang took the opportunity to have Ouyang find stomach meds for her ailing teachers).  Of course, Chinese medicine is a tad different from ours.  Dave was told to quickly drink this little vile of liquid and that it would help his nausea.

IMAG1000
They also told him that it would taste like crap. Seeing as he couldn’t even keep things that tasted GOOD in his stomach, the meds never stood a chance…

Several days later, Dave was feeling better, but then of course my time came to be sick.  After a trip to the doctor to get a sick note (my first sick day in nearly 3 years…) and a trip to the pharmacy to get something to help with the vomiting, I came home and realized that I had no idea what I was even ingesting.  My best guess is that one of them was ground up ginger.  Other than that, all I knew was what Naveed though to ask (how many does she take?).  I’ve gotta say that I’m extremely glad he was with me, because I never would have thought to ask myself!!  haha!!

One of the nausea meds we purchased
One of the nausea meds we purchased
Here's a different type.  How much of this do you understand?  Yeah...we understand about the same amount!!
Here’s a different type. How much of this do you understand? Yeah…we understand about the same amount!!

Being sick sucks…but being sick in another country is a completely different experience.  My hope is that I don’t have to deal with anything as awful as that flu again while I live in the Orient, but in case I do, I’m sure glad my mom already has Gravol on the way!!  You never know what you’re going to miss from back home until you have it!!!!

And that sums up my last week!!  Nothing    particularly exhilarating but they were experiences I won’t be soon forgetting nonetheless.

Thanks for checking in!  I’ll be back with a post about what it’s like living in a Chinese apartment soon! (A request from my nephew 🙂  Super pumped to know people are interested in even the mundane stuff here!)